Delve Too Deep File VIII: “Ashcan” Pete

Hello once again, loyal readers, and welcome back once again to Delve Too Deep! As promised in my previous article, we’re now moving onto the five new investigators joining the battle against evils in the upcoming deluxe, The Dunwich Legacy. Much like last time, we’ll be looking at the strengths and weaknesses of each and every investigator, as well as providing a sample deck and level up options for them. What better way to start off this series with the final investigator to be spoiled, and far and away the most unique of the five: “Ashcan” Pete.

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Notable Strengths of Pete02014.jpg

It’s impossible to talk about Pete without mentioning his unique card and loyal companion Duke. And what a companion he is! Slotless, beginning in play and offering Pete the ability to both Fight and Investigate incredibly effectively from the start of the game, Duke takes the cake for the most powerful unique card in the game. Even at a single use a turn, Duke would be insane, but if you’re able to feed him a treat a turn (in the form of a card from your hand), you can use this powerful hound a second time!

One of the most interesting facts about Pete is that his ability is not even limited to Duke; any asset you control can be used again! The list may be small at the moment, but over time, this ability will only get more powerful due to its flexibility.

With Duke covering Combat and Investigation, Pete is able to use his resilience earned from years on the street to fight off the horrors of the world. A Willpower of 4 and an Agility of 3 mean that Pete will have a solid chance of avoiding a horrid fate at the hands of the elder evils.

Notable Weaknesses of Pete

Pete’s greatest strength is also his greatest weakness; he is absolutely dependent on Duke for success. As such, Pete is much more susceptible to losing his assets than other characters. In addition, if Pete ever does lose Duke, he will likely fall into uselessness very quickly. It’s not likely to happen often, but it’s notable that no other character gets drastically weaker as they become wounded.

Duke’s abilities requiring their own actions also mean that Duke cannot be combined with cards which require actions to activate. Notably, this means that Flashlight, Burglary and every weapon in the game become far worse, especially given Pete’s lower than average stats (though interestingly that does free up his hands for other things).

Finally, Pete’s other main issue is he doesn’t really ever snowball; he starts off fairly powerful, but has weaker scaling than other characters. He never becomes able to use Duke more than he can at the beginning of the game, and is thus much more prone to skill checks gone awry. This becomes especially noticeable on more difficult checks and on higher difficulties, where the¬†inability to spam skill checks m

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One of the best new cards to come out of Dunwich Legacy, Pete can make excellent use of these.

ay be a huge issue.

Build Path: A Man and His Dog

Investigator/Signature Cards
“Ashcan” Pete
Duke – Loyal Hound
Wracked By Nightmares

Assets
2 Dig Deep
1 Leather Coat

1 Scavenging
2 Rabbit’s Foot
2 Stray Cat
2 Ritual Candles
1 Rite of Seeking
2 Pickpocketing

Skills
2 Unexpected Courage
2 Overpower
2 Perception
2 Guts
1 Manual Dexterity

Events
2 Lucky!
2 Look What I Found
2 Bait and Switch
2 Emergency Cache

This deck attempts to mitigate Pete’s scaling weakness with more consistent skill checks. Taking advantage of his free hands, Ritual Candles helps to prevent many failed skilled checks, especially the all important Duke checks. Rabbit’s Foot also helps this issue, allowing you to draw the card you need in order to ready Duke should you fail, with Pickpocketing also allowing you to generate cards and keep safe; your health is more precious than many other investigators, as it’s all over if you lose Duke.

The deck also contains many more cantrip skills than normal, as you need the cards and also coverage of every skill in the game. This should ensure a steady flow of tasty treats for Duke, and hopefully you can speed through the mystery before running into too many threats to either Pete or Duke’s life. Scavenging‘s sole purpose is to occasionally let you pluck an item out of the bin, either to have a wild skill icon with Rabbit’s Foot or to get back Leather Coat to soak some more damage. It’s not essential, but sometime’s it’s neat.

Rite of Seeking is a nice option to have as well, taking advantage of Pete’s inherently high Willpower. Combined with Duke, you have the ability to make three base stat 4 Investigation checks, with Rite and Duke’s synergising well (use Duke to move to a new location and Investigate, do whatever, then Rite of Seeking to grab two more clues!).

Level up options are fairly limited at the moment. However, there are PLENTY of good ones among those. I normally wouldn’t recommend it, but L2 Lucky! is much more valuable in a deck that requires cards in hand. L2 Peter Sylvestre is another great choice; he boosts two valuable stats AND grants you a sanity soak. Close Call is handy, but nowhere near as essential as it is with Wendy. Finally, Will to Survive can be awesome in the late game (especially combined with Duke’s impressive attack), but I’d take Peter and Lucky! first.

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A very defining late campaign card for certain builds of Pete, especially for “Sorcerer” Pete.

As far as cuts go, Lucky! is a simple upgrade, while I’d replace Stray Cat with Peter. Once you get to the point of Will to Survive, cut a Rabbit’s Foot and potentially a Dig Deep if you get a second. Peter’s bonus stats make Dig Deep less essential, and you should have enough ways to get bonuses without the need to sink in resources. Still, it’s nice to have the options sometimes, hence I’d leave one in.

Other Options

Pickpocketing is also a pretty flexible slot; you could try 2 Scrying instead if you’re soloing, or try out one of my favourite new cards: Double or Nothing. Combined with Will to Survive, you can generate some serious action advantage with it. Another reasonable option is to play Shrivelling and turn Pete into a full-blown sorcerer. This eliminates the issue of not being able to spam attacks, as it allows you to make three +1 damage attacks in a turn at a base of 4 if you really need to (two with Duke, one with Pete, or vice versa). I’d probably go for a 1/1 split between Scrying and Shrivelling though, as it’s not as crucial as it is for Agnes or Jim.

Conclusion

“Ashcan” Pete is a very interesting character, possibly the most unique yet. His dependence on Duke may be a risk, but at the same time, it makes his initial strength unmatched. Whilst he may not scale to absurd levels like Agnes or “Skids” may and he cannot play the stall package that I love to play with Wendy, he should remain a solid presence throughout the game (well, as long as Duke is with him).

One thing I do love about the two Survivor characters thus far is that they are remarkably different; while the other characters retain some semblance and consistency between them, Wendy and Pete are apples and oranges. They have very different game plans and play styles, and I can’t wait to give this rugged survivor a try when the Dunwich Legacy does come out.

What do you guys think about Pete? Am I completely wrong with what I play? Let me know with comments on Facebook, Reddit or here! Until next time, Merry Christmas and have a wonderful time gaming!

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*all images taken from arkhamdb.com, or the property of Fantasy Flight Games. Santa Cthulhu image courtesy of DrChrissy (see the original here)

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